2017 Metrics Package

For those team owners who like to make their own projections, or who just obsess over fantasy stats, Fantasy Football Impact’s highly detailed spreadsheets of NFL player performance from the 2016 season are for you! Separate from the 2017 Draft Guide, our Metrics Package is comprised of seven individual Microsoft Excel workbooks. Here is what you get (click on a link below for that workbook’s detailed description):

Our expanded 2017 Metrics Package is now available. Get all seven workbooks at our 2015 price of just $4.99.

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Please note: All of our workbooks and worksheets (including samples) are password protected. This is to ensure the original data is always intact. If you would like to manipulate the worksheets (e.g. change data, sort, hide columns, etc.), simply click on any cell, Select-All (Ctrl-A), Copy (Ctrl-C), open a new workbook and Paste (Ctrl-V). The new workbook will not be password protected and you will be able to make any changes you wish to the new workbook.

Fantasy Points Production Analysis – 2016:

Pertinent fantasy metrics for every scoring player in 2016 by position – 72 quarterbacks, 172 running backs, 220 wide receivers, 130 tight ends, 40 kickers and 32 team defense/special teams. Each position (QB, RB, RB-PPR, WR, WR-PPR, TE, TE-PPR, K, DEF/ST) is presented in its own table (worksheet). For every player, you will find the following metrics:

  • Average draft pick
  • Average round drafted
  • Percent of standard leagues in which the player was drafted
  • Projected auction value for 2016
  • Average auction price paid
  • Percentage of auction leagues in which player was drafted
  • Fantasy points by week (color coded for high score, top-10 rank, plus top 20-rank for RBs and top-30 rank for wide receivers). We use Yahoo! public league scoring settings to determine our fantasy points.
  • Total fantasy points for the season
  • Rank based on total fantasy points for the season
  • Average fantasy points per game played
  • Rank based on average fantasy points per game played
  • Standard deviation of the player’s fantasy points production
  • Coefficient of variation of the player’s fantasy points production (For a discussion of the coefficient of variation, read our article Consistency – The Key to Winning Fantasy Football – Part 2.”
  • High game score for the season
  • Low game score for the season
  • Adjusted average fantasy points per game played. This average is computed without the player’s high- and low-game scores
  • Rank based on adjusted average fantasy points per game played
  • Number of games played
  • Number of games played with fantasy points of less than 10, 10-14.9, 15-19.9, 20-24.9, 25-29.9 and 30 or more
  • Opposing team by week (color-coded for high score, top-10 rank plus top 20-rank for RBs and top-30 rank for wide receivers)

New for 2016 is our Five-Player Comparison Tool. At the bottom of each positional worksheet is a convenient search tool to help the user quickly compare up to five players of interest in the same location instead of searching the entire worksheet for the data.

Click here to download a free sample of our 2016 Fantasy Points Production Analysis workbookYou must have Microsoft Excel 2007 or later versions to view the file as it is in an .xlsx format. The sample presents only the spreadsheet for the running back position (non-PPR) and is not the full workbook.

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Fantasy Points Allowed by Position – 2016:

Similar in format to the Fantasy Points Production workbook, we present each NFL team instead of individual players and analyze their performance in terms of fantasy points allowed to each position (QB, RB, RB-PPR, WR, WR-PPR, TE, TE-PPR, K, DEF/ST) and is presented in its own table (worksheet). For every team, you will find the following metrics:

  • Fantasy points allowed by week (color-coded for high score, top-10 rank, bottom-10 rank and low score). We use Yahoo! public league scoring settings to determine our fantasy points.
  • Total fantasy points allowed for the season
  • Rank based on total fantasy points for the season
  • Average fantasy points allowed per game played
  • Rank based on average fantasy points per game played
  • Standard deviation of the team’s fantasy points allowed
  • Coefficient of variation of the team’s fantasy points allowed (For a discussion of the coefficient of variation, read our article Consistency – The Key to Winning Fantasy Football – Part 2
  • High game score for the season (game with the most points allowed)
  • Low game score for the season (game with the fewest points allowed)
  • Adjusted average fantasy points allowed per game played. This average is computed without the team’s high- and low-game scores
  • Rank based on adjusted average fantasy points per game played
  • Number of games played with fantasy points allowed of less than 10, 10-14.9, 15-19.9, 20-24.9, 25-29.9 and 30 or more
  • In a corresponding table directly below, the opposing team is listed by week (color-coded for high score, top-10 rank, bottom-10 rank and low score). This table is constructed in alphabetical team  order.

Click here to download a free sample of our 2016 Fantasy Points Allowed by Position workbook. You must have Microsoft Excel 2007 or later versions to view the file as it is in an .xlsx format. The sample presents only the spreadsheet for the running back position (non-PPR) and is not the full workbook.

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Team Boxscore Analysis by Player, Position and Scoring Category – 2016: 

This workbook displays every NFL team’s boxscore, but in a much more useful way than you will find on any website. Each team’s offensive game stats are divided into scoring categories (passing, receiving and rushing). Inside each of these categories, the stats are again divided by position. The receiving category breaks out by wide receivers, tight ends and running backs. The rushing category breaks out by running backs, quarterbacks and wide receivers. Also with in each boxscore, fantasy points are calculated by scoring category. For example, the user won’t see just one fantasy point total for Arizona’s David Johnson. Instead, the user will see one total for his rushing performance and another for his receiving. If Johnson had thrown a pass, there would be a fantasy point total for this as well. It’s this level of visibility that makes this sheet so useful. Additionally, this workbook is interactive. The user can change every scoring category to match most league settings, then the entire worksheet recalculates automatically. Which scoring category settings can the user change? Here’s the list:

  • Pass Completions
  • Pass Attempts
  • Passing Yards per Fantasy Point
  • Passing Touchdowns
  • Interceptions
  • Sacks Allowed
  • Passing Yards Bonus
  • Receptions
  • Receiving Yards per Fantasy Point
  • Receiving Touchdowns
  • Receiving Yards Bonus
  • Rushing Attempts
  • Rushing Yards per Fantasy Point
  • Rushing Touchdowns
  • Rushing Yards Bonus
  • Fumbles Lost

This workbook also provides three full-season summaries. The first is season totals of each player for each of the major categories including:

  • Games Played
  • Completions
  • Passing and Rushing Attempts
  • Passing and Receiving Percentages
  • Passing, Receiving and Rushing Yards
  • Yards per Attempt, Reception and Carry
  • Number of 300+ Passing Yard, 100+ Receiving Yard and 100+Rushing Yard Games
  • Passing, Receiving and Rushing Touchdowns
  • Interceptions
  • Sacks
  • Total Passing, Receiving and Rushing Fantasy Points (based on user-supplied scoring settings)
  • Fantasy Points per Passing Attempt, Reception and Carry (based on user-supplied scoring settings)
  • Receptions
  • Receiving Targets
  • Fumbles Lost

The second is season percentages of each player to the team total for each of the major categories including:

  • Games Played
  • Pass Completions
  • Passing and Rushing Attempts
  • Passing, Receiving and Rushing Yards
  • Passing, Receiving and Rushing Touchdowns
  • Interceptions
  • Sacks
  • Passing, Receiving and Rushing Fantasy Points (based on user-supplied settings)
  • Receptions
  • Receiving Targets
  • Fumbles Lost

The third is per game averages of each player in each of the major categories including:

  • Pass Completions
  • Passing and Rushing Attempts
  • Passing, Receiving and Rushing Yards
  • Passing, Receiving and Rushing Touchdowns
  • Interceptions
  • Sacks
  • Total Passing, Receiving and Rushing Fantasy Points (based on user-supplied scoring settings)
  • Receptions
  • Receiving Targets
  • Fumbles Lost

In addition, and for easier analysis, there are five major summary areas that bring together side by side, the weekly production of each player. The first summary shows completions, receptions and carries by game. The second summary displays pass attempts and receiving targets by game. The third summary presents passing, receiving and rushing yards by game. The fourth summary shows passing, receiving and rushing touchdowns by game. The fifth summary displays fantasy passing, receiving and rushing points by game.

But what about other ways players accumulate fantasy points? We have that covered as well. After the five summaries just listed, there is an additional column that records two-point conversions, kickoffs returned for a touchdown, punts returned for a touchdown and fumbles recovered and returned for a touchdown by offensive players.

Not only are regular season boxscores included in this workbook. We have also included all post-season games through the Super Bowl.

This is an incredibly informative and user-friendly tool. No longer will you have to re-calculate fantasy points or scour various websites for the detail you need. It is all for you here in one worksheet!

Click here to download a free sample of our 2016 Team Boxscore Analysis by Player, Position and Scoring Category workbookYou must have Microsoft Excel 2007 or later versions to view the file as it is in an .xlsx format. The sample presents only the spreadsheet for one team (Arizona Cardinals) and is not the full workbook.

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Team Boxscore Analysis Allowed by Position and Scoring Category – 2016: 

This workbook is identical to the Team Boxscore Analysis by Player, Position and Scoring Category workbook described above with two key differences. First, the information is for stats ALLOWED by each team, and second, the individual player information is removed. All of the categories are exactly the same and the user may customize the results by changing the scoring settings at the top of the worksheet. This is a great tool for evaluating the game-by-game performance of each NFL defense.

Click here to download a free sample of our 2016 Team Boxscore Analysis Allowed by Position and Scoring Category workbookYou must have Microsoft Excel 2007 or later versions to view the file as it is in an .xlsx format. The sample presents only the spreadsheet for one team (Arizona Cardinals) and is not the full workbook.

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Positional Receiving Analysis – 2016:

For team owners who want to delve deeply into the tendencies of each NFL team with regard to their passing game tendencies, this workbook consisting of six worksheets is for you! To start with, we provide four worksheets that breakdown each team’s receiving targets, completions, receiving yardage and receiving touchdowns by position (WR, TE and RB). In each worksheet, you will find the following metrics:

  • Team Total and Rank
  • WR Total and Rank
  • WR Mix (percentage of team total) and Rank
  • TE Total and Rank
  • TE Mix (percentage of team total) and Rank
  • RB  Total and Rank
  • RB Mix (percentage of team total) and Rank
  • All Other Positions Total and Rank
  • All Other Positions Mix (percentage of team total) and Rank

All categories above with the exception of “All Other Positions” are color coded for (high score, top-10 rank, bottom-10 rank and low score).

The fifth worksheet is identical to the previous four except that it is a breakdown of fantasy points. What makes this worksheet unique is that it can be customized to the user’s scoring settings (points per reception, receiving yards per point and points per receiving touchdown).

The sixth worksheet contains two tables. The first is Fantasy Points per Target and the second is Fantasy Points per Reception. These tables are built based on the settings entered in the fifth worksheet dealing with fantasy points. Each table contains the same categories as the previous five worksheets except the primarily irrelevant “All Other Positions” information is excluded.

Click here to download a free sample of our 2016 Positional Receiving Analysis workbook. You must have Microsoft Excel 2007 or later versions to view the file as it is in an .xlsx format. The sample presents only the spreadsheet for one category (Receiving Targets) and is not the full workbook.

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Kicker Analysis – 2016:

This workbook is a detailed, game-by-game table of each NFL kicker’s performance. For each week, the user will find information in the following categories:

  • Extra Points Made and Attempted and made
  • Field Goals Made and Attempted
  • Field Goals Attempted and Made by distance (1-19, 20-29, 30-39, 40-49 and 50+)
  • Longest Field Goal
  • Total Fantasy Points (based on user-supplied scoring settings)

As we find that kickers are more productive on a team that wins its weekly match-up (read our article on Streaming a Fantasy Kicker in Fantasy Football), we have also broken out the same stats listed above as to whether the kicker’s team won that match-up or found its way into the loss column. The difference for most kickers is eye-opening. We also have the same stats broken down for home and away games.

Additionally, this workbook is interactive. The user can change  scoring categories to match most league settings, then the entire worksheet recalculates automatically. Which scoring categories settings can the user change? Here’s the list:

  • Extra Point Made, Attempted or Missed
  • Field Goal Made, Attempted or Missed – less than 40 yards
  • Field Goal Made, Attempted or Missed – 40-49 yards
  • Field Goal Made, Attempted or Missed – 50 yards or longer

This workbook also provides, on a second worksheet, a detailed full-season summary of each player for each of the major categories including:

  • Extra Points Made, Attempted and Extra Point Conversion Percentage
  • Field Goals Made, Attempted and Field Goal Conversion Percentage
  • Field Goals Made distribution percentage by distance
  • Field Goals Made, Attempted and Field Goal Conversion Percentage – less than 40 yards
  • Field Goals Made, Attempted and Field Goal Conversion Percentage – 40-49 yards
  • Field Goals Made, Attempted and Field Goal Conversion Percentage – 50 yards or longer
  • Longest Field Goal
  • Total Fantasy Points (based on user-supplied scoring settings)
  • Fantasy Points per Game (based on user-supplied scoring settings)
  • Fantasy Points per Field Goal Made (based on user-supplied scoring settings)

In this summary section, each of the above categories is color-coded to indicate high score, top-10 rank, bottom-10 rank and low score. The fantasy point calculations and color coding for rankings changes automatically when the user changes the scoring settings on the first worksheet.

Click here to download a free sample of our 2016 Kicker Analysis workbookYou must have Microsoft Excel 2007 or later versions to view the file as it is in an .xlsx format. The sample presents only the information on four kickers (Chandler Catanzaro, Matt Bryant, Justin Tucker and Dan Carpenter) and is not the full workbook.

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Team Defense Analysis – 2012 through 2016:

Although this is our smallest workbook, it covers the longest period of time – five years. Each NFL team’s defensive stats are presented from 2012 – 2016 side by side for the following categories:

  • Points Allowed
  • Sacks
  • Safeties
  • Interceptions
  • Fumbles Recovered
  • Turnover Touchdowns
  • Blocked Kicks
  • Kick Return Touchdowns
  • Total Fantasy Points (We use Yahoo! public league scoring settings to determine our fantasy points.)

For easier analysis, each category and year is color-coded (high score, top-10 ranking, bottom-10 ranking and low score).

A second table is located directly below the first. It displays the same information, except that it displays each team’s NFL ranking in each category in each year. For example, the Arizona Cardinals posted the most sacks in 2016 with 48. In the first table, the “48” is highlighted in red as the high score. In the second table,  the entry for the Arizona Cardinals is “1” and also is color-coded in red to indicate the high score.

Click here to download a free sample of our Team Defense Analysis 2012-2016 workbook. You must have Microsoft Excel 2007 or later versions to view the file as it is in an .xlsx format. The sample presents only the information on six defenses  (Arizona, Atlanta, Baltimore, Buffalo, Carolina and Chicago) and is not the full workbook.

Our 2017 Metrics Package is now available. Get all seven workbooks at our 2015 price of just $4.99.

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Draft Guide 2017

Related articles at Fantasy Football Impact:

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2015 Draft Guide by Fantasy Football Impact

Disclaimer: Fantasy football is a game of speculation; therefore, Fantasy Football Impact disclaims all warranties, expressed or implied, regarding player performance or results associated with its opinions or advice.